11 Beatles Songs Where Ringo Starr Did the Lead Vocal

This legendary band from Liverpool, England captured the heart of many with their mop-top hair and lovely songs during the 60s. From their first single, Love Me Do to their last album Let It Be, The Beatles were simply a class of their own. Many of their songs have landed number 1 in the music chart. Young and adults have to queue in line just to get tickets for their concerts. They were regarded by music lovers as one if not the greatest band that stamped their class in music industry. The Beatles is composed of John Lennon (vocals, rhythm guitar), Paul McCartney (vocals, bass guitar), George Harrison (vocals, and lead guitar) and Ringo Starr (drums, vocals). Ringo Starr (Richard Starkey) was not the original drummer for the Beatles. Pete Best was the first drummer, but continually didn’t show up due to illness. Ringo Starr, a well known drummer for another band, Rory and The Hurricanes in Liverpool, would sit in with the Beatles on many occasions after initially meeting the Be...

Nine Bands That Rod Stewart Was In

Rod Stewart is best known as a solo singer who, throughout the 1970's & 80's and beyond, racked up the hits in the UK. It all started with his debut solo single 'Maggie May' in 1971 which raced to the top of the charts. Rod Stewart reached the top spot in the UK charts on 6 occasions and reached the top 10 many times more. What is less known about Rod Stewart, to the casual music fan anyway, is that throughout the 1960's Rod Stewart was very active on the music scene (with rather limited success it has to be said). During that decade, Rod Stewart performed with no less than nine different bands. Here we will take a look at the nine bands that Rod Stewart was in before his solo career took off. (Rod Stewart during the 1970's - Image Source) 1. The Ray Davies Quartet In the days before the final line up of the Kinks came about, Ray Davies was trying to get a band together. In 1962, Rod Stewart joined the band but didn't last too long. The reason for Rod Stewart being kicked out...

Facts About the Classical Period in Music

The classical era spans roughly 80 years in music history during the 18th and 19th centuries and is often associated with the movement called the Age of Reason. It is defined by a return to symmetry and simplicity not only in music, but also in architecture and fine art. The excavation of Pompeii began in 1748, and the visible remains which were drawn and engraved became a template for the aesthetics of the time. The best known composers from the Classical period are Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn. Time Period Most musicologists mark the death of J.S. Bach in 1750 as the end of the Baroque era and the dawn of the Classical era. There is less consensus on when it ended: some consider the death of Beethoven in 1827 to be the boundary line whilst others cite 1800 as the beginning of the Romantic era. The Oxford Companion to Music marks the end of the Classical era as "sometime between 1800 and 1830". Few disagree that there was an overlapping of classical and romantic ideals by the early 1...

60 Interesting Facts About the Beatles: The Greatest Rock and Roll Band Ever

The Beatles, composed of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, is undoubtedly the most popular and most successful rock and roll group in the history of popular music and entertainment. This British rock music group revolutionized popular music around the world in the 1960s with their stimulating songwriting and vibrant performances. Here are some entertaining and interesting facts about this magnificent and extremely famous band. 1.) The Beatles are the “best-selling band in history. 2.) All the members of The Beatles were born in Liverpool, England, in the early 1940s. 3.) Both McCartney and Starr are left-handed. They are the only two surviving members of the Beatles. 4.) James Paul McCartney, the second youngest member of the Beatles, who was born on June 18, 1942, is listed in the Guinness World Records as the "most successful musician and composer in popular music history". 5.) McCartney had 60 gold disc and sa...

Beatles Songs About Liverpool

When it comes to songwriting, the Beatles are right up there at the top. In their time, they composed well over 200 songs - many have been covered many times by many different bands or artists. The Beatles, and especially John Lennon and Paul McCartney, drew influence for their songwriting from their personal experiences. Considering that they all came from Liverpool, one would think that their hometown would feature quite heavily in their songwriting. The truth is though; there are not many Beatles songs about their hometown of Liverpool.  Here we will take a look at the Beatles songs that do have some kind of reference to Liverpool in the lyrics. Penny Lane  YouTube The lyrics to this Beatles song were nothing more than Paul McCartney taking a look at a suburban shopping street in Liverpool; albeit with a pair of psychedelic glasses firmly on. Originally meant for the Sgt Peppers album, instead it was released as a double A side with Strawberry Fi...

10 Most Beautiful Pieces for Piano

The piano, indeed, is one of the most popular musical instruments around the world - for its beautiful sound and the countless number of pieces one can compose with it. There are many famous pieces out there, and for the little pianists, I have selected ten most beautiful pieces (in my opinion) which sound great. The key to playing well regardless the difficulty, is practising. The more you practise, the better you will play. Hope you enjoy this list: 1. Ballade pour Adeline Ballade pour Adeline (French for "Ballad for Adeline") was composed by Paul de Senneville and Olivier Toussaint as a 1976 instrumental. Paul de Senneville composed the piece as a tribute to his newborn daughter whose name was Adeline. The first recording was made by Richard Clayderman, a well-known pianist, and world-wide sales have now reached 22 million copies in 38 countries. Probably my most favourite piano piece, it sounds peaceful and soothes one's feelings; really a must-learn for all pianists.   Lis...

10 Bands Who Took Their Name From The Novel A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange was a novel written by Anthony Burgess in 1962. The novel has gone down in history as being one of the most popular stories of all time. It has been adapted into TV, radio and the stage but the most renowned adaptation must have been the 1971 film 'A Clockwork Orange', directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick. The novel itself has been the basis from which many different bands have taken their name from - countless others have made reference to the novel in their song lyrics. Here we will take a brief look at ten bands who took their name from the novel 'A Clockwork Orange'. It has to be said that most of the bands named below had very limited success on the music scene; perhaps taking your band name from this novel is not the best of ideas. 1. Clockwork Orange Taking their name from the title of the novel, Clockwork Orange were a progressive rock band that hailed from Bangalore in India. 2. The Clockwork Oranges Another band who took their name from the ti...

20 Facts About U2

U2 have been ‘doing it’ since the late 1970's and are still performing today, they really are one of the hardest working bands ever. Throughout their career, and what a long career it has been, U2 have kept their fans rocking with their music. Here we will take a look at 20 facts about U2. (U2 - Image via Wikipedia) U2 released their album 'War' in 1983, later on that year, the band War included a medley called U2 on their 1983 record 'Life (Is So Strange)'. U2 have never performed the song, from the Joshua Tree album, 'Red Hill Mining Town' live. Bono may be one for 'saving the world' but he thought nothing of having his favourite hat flown from London to Italy before performing at a charity concert with Luciano Pavarotti in 2003. During U2's first dates outside Ireland, they played a gig at the Islington's Hope and anchor to a crowd of only 9 people. U2 was only the fourth music group to appear on the front cover of Time magazine, after the Beatles, the Ban...

What Was the First Hit Single Released by a Solo Ex-Beatle?

Just recently, I was asked what the official first hit single by a solo ex-Beatle was? Something in my memory sprang to the fore and made me say it was ‘My Sweet Lord’ by George Harrison, but at the first opportunity, I had to go and check. The first thing to consider before working out the answer is where the parameters lie – at what point did the Beatles become ex-Beatles? Their final single release (in the UK) was ‘Let It Be’ in March 1970, their final album release (in the UK) was ‘Let It Be’ in May 1970 but the band itself did not officially disband then. It is important to note that all subsequent dates refer to releases in the UK only. (The Beatles in happier times! - Image Source) The act of dissolution of the band known as the Beatles began on the 31st December 1970, when Paul McCartney raised a legal suit. It was to be a rather long drawn-out process. Although it took until 1975 for every legal dispute to be ‘ironed’ ...

Singers Whose Surname Is Brown That Have Had Hits In The UK Chart

The number of artists with the surname Brown that have had hits in the UK charts is rather large compared to many other surnames. Granted, some of them have had limited chart success but some have scored plenty of hits. Here we will look at all the artists with the surname Brown that have charted in the UK charts. First up in the list is Bobby Brown. The ex New Edition singer first hit the UK charts in August 1988 with the song Don't Be Cruel, but it failed to make the top 40, peaking at number 42. The follow up single from Bobby Brown, My Prerogative, did much better, climbing to a peak of number 6 in late 1988 and spending at total of 10 weeks on the UK charts - it hit the number one spot in the US. Over the next 8 years, Bobby Brown had a further 17 chart hits in the UK including 10 top 10 hits.  If Bobby Brown had a rather long chart career in the UK then the next Brown on our list was the polar opposite. Arthur Brown, under the name of The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, score...

A Review of Slicethepie.com

Slicethepie.com is a music review site where you can actually earn money for listening to music. Of course it isn't quite as simple as that, but there isn't much hard work involved. In order to earn money on Slicethepie.com, you have to review songs. You do this by listening to approx 90 seconds of a song and then writing a review on it, as well as giving the song/music a score from 1 - 10. Slicethepie.com pay earnings into your Paypal account and the minimum earnings is $10.00, which is fairly easy to achieve if you write good reviews. They usually pay you within 5 days of requesting your earnings. Earning more than a few dollars a day can be hard, especially if you're reviewing songs that are essentially quite poor. However, the better your reviews, the more money you will earn per review. Slicethepie.com distinguish how much you get paid per review by certain factors. These include your rank, experience and energy levels. The higher your rank is, the higher your base payment per...

Symphony No. 2 in C Minor (Resurrection): Gustav Mahler's Greatest Work

Influenced by the highly developed harmonic language inherited from Liszt and Wagner, Gustav Mahler was one of the last great figures of the Romantic Movement. Among the various aesthetics of the nineteenth century, the wave of interest in folk music developed by Brahms, Dvorak and Liszt, to name but a few, ignited a spark in Mahler's fertile imagination. Side by side to his immense symphonic structures, the composer continued as well the tradition of creating art songs which embraced the simplicity and directness of folk music. This he did without deviating from the mode of expression of the time and fully utilizing the orchestral resources available to him. Starting in 1888, Mahler composed two-and-a-half volumes of songs with orchestra under the collective title of Des Knaben Wunderhorn ("The Youth's Magic Horn"), employing German poems in the folk style from an anthology of the same name by Ludwig Achim von Arnim and Clemens Brentano. In these songs Mahler captures the essence of ...

6 Rock Songs on Cheating: 1 Bryan Adams, 4 Bon Jovi and 1 KISS

Songs are more fun when they tell stories. Getting creative for good songwriters isn’t all that hard. Even when they are talking about relationships, they can tell millions of stories. And since cheating is very common, why not get their creative juices flowing for that theme, right? It might be as innocent as not being able to help falling for someone unavailable or not so sweet as in sleeping with someone all the while they know they are being involved and not caring at all. Here we go: Artist: Bryan Adams, Song: Fearless - Album: On a Day Like Today (1998) YouTube Fearless has good music and brilliant vocals. I mean, it is Bryan Adams we are talking about. But the song is about a girl who is with someone else and Bryan wants to be with her no matter what. Sure, he would love it if the girl left the other guy. Of course we can’t know whether it is good fiction or Bryan really fell for someone attached in real life as well. Great song. If you do ignore the fact that t...

Facts About Israel Kamakawiwoole Hawaiian Music over the Rainbow

  Contemporary Hawaiian and Luau Music includes a blend of various ethnic traditions including; Hawaiian Rock, Pop, Soul and Jawaiian Reggae Music. Popular Hawaiian Artists who combine the best of Contemporary Hawaiian, "Hula Music", "Luau Music" and "Traditional Hawaiian Songs" include; "The Brothers Cazimero", international Hawaiian recording Artist "Don Ho", and "Israel Kamakawiwo'ole" or "IZ" as he was affectionately called. "Israel Kamakawiwo'ole" was Born in Honolulu Hawaii in 1959 and spent the first five years of his life with his Grandfather, ( "Tutu Kane" in Hawaiian ) on the Hawaiian island of Niihau. In 1964 he returned to the island of Oahu to live with his immediate family and learned the importance of his Hawaiian language and heritage. IZ was a native Hawaiian, who upon his death in 1997, at the age of 38, was only the second citizen to receive the honor of having his bo...

12 Interesting Facts About ABBA

ABBA was one of the most successful singing bands of the early 70s to the early 80s composed mainly of two Swedish singing couples, whose given names make up the acronym name for the group; Agnetha Faltskog, Bjorn Ulvaeus, Benny Anderson and Anni-Frid Lyngstad. I suppose everyone from ages 40 up could very well recall their past listening to ABBA songs and for those aged below 40, couldn’t help but appreciate the great song classics left by ABBA. 1. The fusion of two singers-songwriters which was considered the vital part of ABBA happened on a crossroad, at the countryside. The bus with Benny’s group, the Hep Stars and the Hootenanny Singers with Bjorn met up on the way to a concert/party. 2. Agnetha was a self-confessed Connie Francis fan and used to sing and imitate her moves. 3. Anni-Frid Lyngstad was Norwegian by birth fathered by a German soldier who was on assignment at Norway when he met Anni’s mother which sprouted a relationship. 4. Ring Ring was ABBA&rsq...

10 Best Selling Love Duets

Time and again we will be awestruck by the lines on a song aired on the radio or played on TV. I have here 10 of the best selling love duets which may help you refresh your memory just in case you need some break out of mental block owing to too much blogging. I hope you will like them. You Don’t Bring Me Flowers (1978)– Barbra Streisand and Neil Diamond Originally a song written by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman for an ill fated TV show, it was later unfitted to be performed and Neil Diamond and other contributors expanded the song. This song made a hit for Neil Diamond and Barbra Streisand making it to the top of Billboard Hot 100 Chart in 1978. The song took the # 1 slot on the Hot 100 for two consecutive weeks in December of the same year. With You I’m Born Again (1979)- Billy Preston and Syreeta Wright This song immortalizes the successful team up of Billy Preston and Syreeta Wright. It had been the former’s biggest hit in 5 years and the latter&r...

Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 1 in D Major - Evolution of a Small Work

During his student days at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where Rimsky-Korsakov declared him to be "gifted but immature," Prokofiev was known as the enfant terrible of the composition department; he had established early on a reputation as the composer of "shocking" music. Most of his early works are marked by their bold experimentalism.  For example, the piano work Sarcasms (1912-14), to pick just one, may be described as astringent and full of cutting rhythmic edges, while the Piano Concerto No. 2 (1912-13) is still considered audacious in its dense complexity. Alongside these works, however, he also wrote compositions influenced by the Romantic and Post-romantic styles.  Works like the symphonic poems Dreams (1910) and Autumnal Sketch (1910), and the Ballade (1912) for cello and piano exhibit varying degrees of mellifluousness, mellowness and a feeling of relaxation. Such is also the case of the First Violin Concerto. The first page of the sol...

French Impressionism in Music: Debussy's "La Mer"

The term "Impressionism" was coined in the mid-19th century to describe a new theory of aesthetics in painting and literature predicated upon a rejection of the forms and practices of the past, most particularly against the Romantic predilection for the expression of heroism, sentimentality and exaggerated pathos. The Impressionist painters emphasized design, color and light rather than form and substance. The poets of this school sought to appeal to the senses rather than the intellect of their readers by utilizing words, for example, for the sake of their "color" rather than meaning. The Impressionists valued the feeling or impression aroused by a subject more than the subject itself. As a young man, Debussy was highly influenced by these artists; in embracing the aesthetic ideals of the Impressionists, Debussy rejected the musical traditions and forms of the past. Generally considered the founder of the modern school of harmony, he did for music what the Impressi...

20 Facts About The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones have been 'doing it' since the early 1960's and are still performing today, they really are one of the hardest working bands ever. Throughout their career, and what a long career it has been, the Rolling Stones have kept their fans rocking with their music. Here we will take a look at 20 facts about the Rolling Stones. (The Rolling Stones - Image via Wikipedia) One of the cameramen on the 1970 documentary film about the Rolling Stones, Gimme Shelter, was none other than legendary film director George Lucas. Martin Scorsese has used the Rolling Stones song 'Gimme Shelter' in four of the films he has made. The cake that was featured on the cover of the Rolling Stones 1969 'Let It Bleed' album was baked by future TV star Delia Smith. The 1972 Rolling Stones album 'Exile on Main Street' had the working title of 'Tropical Disease'. The only Rolling Stones studio album that has failed to reach the top 5 in the UK album charts was 1997's 'Bridges To Babylon',...

Writer's Choice: Serenade for Strings, Op. 48 - Tchaikovsky's Finest Work

Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 During the autumn of 1880, Tchaikovsky composed two of his most popular and enduring works: the Serenade for Strings, written between September 21 and November 4; and the 1812 Overture, written between October 12 and November 19. Given the popularity that both of these works have attained in the concert stage, it is interesting to note that the two works could not have been farther apart when it came to the composer's affection toward each; while he loved the former, he loathed the latter. The 1812 Overture was written for the forthcoming All-Russian Art and Industrial Exhibition. It was his friend, former teacher and mentor, Nicolai Rubinstein, who suggested that Tchaikovsky should compose either an overture for the opening of the exhibition, a work to celebrate Tsar Alexander II's silver jubilee or a cantata to mark the opening of Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior. Although he ended up combining two of Rubinstein's suggestions, it is a w...

Song Review: Michael Jackson's Earth Song

"Earth Song" is a song written and composed by Michael J. Jackson. This song is found on Michael Jackson's "History" album which was released in 1995. The song was about conservation of the planet, and had strong anti-violence and anti-animal abuse themes. The song's melody is one of my favorites of Michael Jackson's music. "Earth Song" was also released on "This Is It" soundtrack, Michael created a moving short film that was specially for his concerts before his untimely death on June 25, 2009. "Earth Song" was typical of Michael Jackson's beautiful and touching humanitarian themed inspired art. The song is a cry for change by the people in this world. Michael Jackson sang and composed many songs like these lyrics. He told the world to look at themselves in individual mirrors in "Man in the Mirror." He told his many audiences of fans to "Heal the World" an to use our power to change the world and the people inside of it. "Earth Song" has had a ressurgence since Michael's death, as th...

Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances (1915-17)

The greatest composer of his country, Béla Bartók developed his early interest in Hungarian folk music into a serious study of folk melodies and their origins. His compositions reconcile revolutionary musical ideas with a deep appreciation for his homeland and its peasant culture. Prior to Bartók's contribution, popular, "folk-like" songs had provided material for Hungarian nationalist composers. In his autobiography, Bartók reveals that he realized early on that these songs were inauthentic -- and also musically insufficient to hold the seeds of inspiration for "serious" composition. While vacationing in central Hungary in 1904, young Bartók was struck by a haunting melody sung by a peasant girl; the composer made sketches of the tune and others indigenous to the same district, noting their similarities and speculating that each region of the country might possess a distinct folk style. Annually from 1906, Bartók traveled around the countr...

19 Things Rocker Bryan Adams and Rock Band Bon Jovi Have in Common

Bon Jovi is a rock band from New Jersey, founded in 1984. Its members are Jon Bon Jovi, Richie Sambora, David Bryan and Tico Torres. Bryan Adams is a Canadian rocker who released his first album in 1980. This rocker and this Jersey rock band have more things in common than just rock n' roll: 1. Bryan Adams was born in 1959, so was Bon Jovi lead guitarist Richie Sambora. 2. Bon Jovi’s keyboard player David Bryan’s actual surname is Rashbaum. So Bryan is also his name. 3. Bon Jovi only changed one member in their history- bassist Alec John Such. Alec was fired after the band's best of album Cross Road (1994) and he was unofficially replaced by Hugh McDonald and the band has been playing with him since. Bryan Adams, despite being a solo artist, has also been performing with the same musicians for years. One of these musicians is Canadian guitarist Keith Scott, who also happens to be Bryan's best friend. Bon Jovi band members are also very close friends. 4. Both Bo...

Top 10 Bollywood Viral Songs

Music is an extremely important aspect of Indian films. A regular Bollywood (Indian counterpart of the Hollywood) masala movie is incomplete without at least one peppy dance number, a romantic love song, and a heart wrenching sad song.  The change of the decade ushered in a new era for Indian films, and more so, for Indian music. Fortunes were turned instantaneously within the Indian music industry, and fates were sealed almost as soon as a song was launched. The last few years were extremely fruitful for Indian composers and artists alike, for some songs went in to shatter records worldwide. We got to see some major hits resulting from domestic talents, as well as International collaborations with some of the best known artists worldwide. In this article, I will be listing the songs that were declared as huge hits and are being played and loved by the masses even today. Some of you may like all of these songs; some may not like some of the songs; while others may not like any o...

Unsung Guitar Greats: Elliot Easton

Elliot Easton, born Elliot Steinberg on December 18, 1953, in Brooklyn, New York, is best known as the lead guitarist for the phenomenally popular 70s band, the Cars. Emerging from the New Wave music scene of the mid-70s, the Cars line-up consisted of lead singer and rhythm guitarist Ric Ocasek, lead singer and bass guitarist Benjamin Orr, guitarist Elliot Easton, keyboard player Greg Hawkes, and drummer David Robinson. With their highly polished, mechanically-tight pop/rock formula, the Cars burst onto the scene and ultimately became the most popular and successful  American rock & roll band of the late '70s and early '80s--with a string of platinum albums and Top 40 singles to their credit.  (They were also remarkably popular as solo artists.) This popularity was due in no small way to the remarkably clever and tasteful guitar talents of Elliot Easton. Having studied music at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, the left-handed Elliot wasn’t c...

Henry Purcell's "Sound the Trumpet" - British Song of the Late Seventeenth Century

Sound the Trumpet Henry Purcell was perhaps the greatest native-born composer in the history of English music, until the advent of Sir Edward Elgar to the scene in the second half of the nineteenth century. Purcell was organist at the Chapel Royal and Westminster Abbey, where he is buried. Like Mozart and Mendelssohn, Purcell was a child prodigy, his first-known composition being published at the age of eight; like the two aforementioned composers, he had a productive career that was condensed into a lifetime of only thirty-six years. Purcell wrote music for the church, for the theater and for every kind of private performance; between 1690 and 1695 alone, he wrote incidental music for more than 40 plays. Statue of Purcell in Westminster The one category within Purcell's output that covers almost the entire period of his known activity as a composer (1680-1695) is the series of court odes and "welcome songs." As the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians indicates, "although they...

The Rite of Spring (1913): the Nationalistic Period of Stravinsky

The son of a leading bass at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Igor Stravinsky studied with Rimsky-Korsakov, Debussy and Dukas. Following the commission of The Firebird (1910) by Serge Diaghilev for his Ballets Russes, Stravinsky went with the company to Paris and spent much of his time in France from then onwards, continuing his association with Diaghilev. The booking of foreign artists and the performance of modern music were coming under official scrutiny and economic conditions were such that few organizations could no longer afford even a fraction of Stravinsky’s fee. Stravinsky's Munich recital with his duo partner in February 1933 was to be his last German concert appearance of any kind for more than three years, and with that single exception, a Baden-Baden performance of the Concerto for two solo pianos with his son Soulima in April 1936, his last public appearance in Germany until 1951. Stravinsky composed his music at the keyboard, often struggling to play h...

Three B's of the Greatest Composers in Music History : Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms

Germany is rich in culture and historical accounts and so in the music history.  German musician-composers had contributed a large amount of musical theories and works which the present generation had benefited from. Germany had produced numerous composers, but the greatest composers in the music history includes the “Three B’s” known on different musical eras; Johann Sebastian Bach (Baroque period), Ludwig van Beethoven (Classical period-Romantic period ) and Johannes Brahms (Romantic period). Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 –  28 July 1750) A portrait of Bach in 1743  by a German painter Elias Gottlob Haussmann Bach a native of iEisenach, Saxe-Eisenach was a popular composer during the era of Baroque music period. The word "baroque" came from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning "misshapen pearl", a strikingly fitting characterization of the architecture of this period; later, the name came to be applied also ...

Paul McCartney: Beatles Bass Player and Other Instruments

Paul McCartney is best known as being a member of the Beatles. In which he was credited as being a vocalist and the bass player. His talents went much further than that though with the band and he often tried his hands at other instruments. Beatles songs abound with Paul tinkling at the piano or adding acoustic guitar, over and above his normal bass playing duties. Here we will take a look at some of the Beatles songs where Paul McCartney played other instruments. (Paul McCartney in 2009 - Image via Wikipedia) Another Girl (1965) This song was primarily written by McCartney, possibly with his then girlfriend Jane Asher in mind. Included in the film Help!, Another Girl is peppered with Paul playing lead guitar. Back In The USSR (1968) When Ringo temporarily quite the Beatles on the 22nd August 1968, it was left to Paul to play the basic drum track to this song from the White Album. Interestingly, Paul also plays lead guitar on this one but it should be pointed out, not at the sam...

6 Rock Songs That Feature Harmonica: Songs by Poison, U2, Bon Jovi and Bryan Adams

          How do you like your rock instruments? It goes without saying that all great rock songs feature lots of guitar and drums. But how about harmonica? Some songs become more fun with the addition of this instrument. It is most often played by the singer. And harmonica-featuring rock songs are perfect for dancing. Here some of the most upbeat rock numbers featuring the fun instrument: Poison - Poor Boy Blues Image via g-ecx.image amazon.com This is a song from the 1990 Poison album Flesh and Blood. It produced many popular songs. While Poor Boy Blues isn’t the most famous Poison track ever, it is one of the most entertaining. Its mood is also very contrary to the word “blues” it carries in the title. Poison - Bastard Son of a Thousand Blues Image via www.sleazeroxx.com This one is featured in the 1993 album Native Tongue .The album is a successful combination of glam, classic rock, rock n’ rol...

Umm Kalthoum: Legend of the East

Umm Kalthoum (Arabic: ?? ?????) (1904–1975), an Egyptian singer and musician, was the most famous singer in the Arab world in 20th century. She was born to a modest family in one of Egypt’s villages, Senbellawein, Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt. She was influenced by her father, an imam (Koran reader), who taught her the instruction of Islam as well as trained her to recite it perfectly. Umm Kalthoum singing talent appeared at a very young age. When she was twelve years old, she had the chance to sing in public, and at the age of sixteen she was recognized by a famous singer, who invited her to go to Cairo, where her talent could be explored and appreciated. In 1923, Umm Kalthoum went to Cairo, where she was invited to the house of Amin Al-Mahdy, who taught her how to play the oud (an Arabic musical instrument). Al-Mahdy introduced Umm Kalthoum to the cultural and intellectual circles in Cairo, specifically the late famous poet Ahmad Rami, who wrote 137 songs for her. Rami ...

12 Best Feats of All Time

The music industry is thriving through changing times as influenced by the ever changing society giving rise to new genres of music that become the trend until another one will take over and replace what exists. As observed, it remains a similar fad with only the names changing. One evident example is how “duets” declined from the music world to be replaced by “feats”. What it seemed was there was no actual difference between a duet and a feat only that the latter was meant to shorten the word “featuring” which happens when a band, invites an outsider from the group to participate in the delivery of the music (like Black Eyed Peas feat Justin Timberlake in Where is the Love) or a solo artist employs the participation of another singer to perform a duet (like Lady Gaga feat Beyonce in Telephone) the latter of course is no different from a duet considering two performers/singers were involved. Whatever it should be called to suit the changing times, ...

Most Expensive Guitars

Here are some of the most expensive guitars in production today. 1. Martin Jorma Kaukonen Custom Artist model. Designed with the assistance of the former Jefferson Airplane guitarist, this is a breathtaking acoustic with a full dreadnought sized body. An Italian spruce top is complemented by the Indian Rosewood back and sides, and gorgeous colored purfling. This guitar has a full, balanced and rich sound that will only get better with age, as all Martins are known to. List price $6199.00. 2. R Taylor Style 1. A beautiful piece of craftsmanship from Taylor, this acoustic guitar is another Indian rosewood bodied instrument with an American spruce top. Incredibly strong and powerful in sound this guitar is known for sugar sweet tonality. List price $ 7030.00. 3. You can’t name an electric guitarist who hasn’t owned or lusted after a Gibson Les Paul guitar. The Gibson Les Paul Custom Limited Edition is at the top right now at a list price of $6821.00. This version of the ...

Pierced Voices : 5 Female Singers with Facial Piercings

              Body piercing is a growing trend among celebrities especially musicians and there could be a lot in the list if we have to consider what is hidden beyond what our eyes could see. Although ear piercing is commonly accepted as a normal requirement for the attachment of earrings among women, the act of body piercing has gone beyond our expectations through the years with varied locations in the human body many celebrities have dared to tread like the nose, lower lip, upper lip, nipples and you know where else. Body piercing simply mirrors the trials each personality who adopts it is undergoing, perhaps a sign of protest to feel different from the others, a sign of achievement or simply a reason to be noticed from the rest of the social grouping. I have only recognized two celebrities associated with the word “Pierce” without directly showing the act associated with it and we knew him as the ex-James...

Singers Whose Surname Is White That Have Had Hits In The UK Charts

As a surname, White may not be as popular as other coloured surnames, but that hasn't stopped a number of singers called White having had chart hits in the UK. As with most shared musicians surnames, none of them are related, and their chart careers can either be hit or miss - a number of chart hits versus just the one or two. Anyroads, without much further ado, here is a look at all the singers whose surname is White that have had hits in the UK charts. First on the list of singers whose surname is White that have had hits in the UK charts is by far the biggest and best known of all of them. Barry White. Popularly known as the 'Walrus Of Love', Barry White had his first UK chart hit in the summer of 1973 when I'm Gonna Love You Just A Little Bit More Baby hit a peak of number 23. Early the following year, follow up single Never Never Gonna Give Ya Up hit a peak of number 14. The career of Barry White was about to climb even higher. US number one Can't Get Enough Of Your Love Babe h...

Top Ten 1950's and 1960's Teen Singing Idols

Every generation has its young singing idols. The 1950s and early '60s was especially rich in talent that catered to the teenage crowd. Here are ten unforgettable teen-oriented solo artists from that bygone era... Elvis Presley (1935-1977) The undisputed King of Rock 'n' Roll, Elvis Presley took the music world by storm during the Eisenhower era. Parents groaned but screaming teens went wild, as Elvis went on to score a slew of number one hits, including "Heartbreak Hotel," "Don't Be Cruel," "Love Me Tender," "Too Much," "All Shook Up," "Jailhouse Rock," "Don't" and "Stuck on You." Elvis made the leap to motion pictures in 1956, appearing as Clint Reno in Love Me Tender. And the rest, as they say, is history. Elvis Presley, 20th Century-Fox, 1956 - Heritage Auction Galleries Ricky Nelson (1940-1985) The youngest son of big band artists Ozzie and ...

The Death of Mozart: Requiem in D Minor, K. 626

Requiem in D minor, K. 626 Although he had been involved with music for the Catholic church, throughout the time that he lived in Salzburg, Mozart wrote very little sacred music after moving to Vienna in 1781. Among the only such works he wrote in that city were the Mass in C minor, K. 427 (1783) which remained unfinished, the oratorio Davidde penitente, K. 469 (1785), the beautiful motet Ave verum corpus, K. 618 (June, 1791), and the Requiem in D minor, K. 626 (late in 1791), which death prevented him from completing. "Mozart's Last Days" (1872) by Hermann Kaulbach.  In 2009, researchers found new evidence that Mozart likely died from a strep throat infection, and not by poisoning. In the summer of 1791, Mozart was visited by a mysterious emissary who informed the composer that a "very illustrious gentleman [who] wishes to remain anonymous" had requested the composition of a Requiem "to celebrate the anniversary of the death of someone very dear to h...

The Desiderata and The Sunscreen Song: a Comparative Analogy of Hope

The other day, the radio station I normally listen to played the once-popular "Sunscreen Song"; which got me thinking about the Desiderata, a popular (though perhaps less-known today) poetic passage attributed to Max Ehrmann.  Both of these pieces give advice on how to live a good and happy life, or how to be human.  And that, in turn, got me to thinking about what it truly is that makes us human.  What is it that gives humans the uppermost rung on the food chain ladder?  Well, many things come to mind; of course there is the obvious: we stand erect, have opposable thumbs, and learned to make fire.  But some of our more acute abilities are also more refined: the ability to reason and feel guilt, to plan or scheme, to hate and love, to reminisce...and to hope.  It is this ability to hope, which when all else has been stripped from us, is at the very core of our survival.  We hope.  Hope is the motivating factor in so...

Michael Jackson's Best Songs Ever (Free Video Download)

Here is a list of Michael Jackson’s top 10 songs (video). Just visit these links (click them and the downloading will start) and feel free to download them. Hope you enjoy them all. Hi friends. I was just sitting and wondering the list of all the Hollywood and Hollywood singers and singers from all around the globe. Many names came into my mind from the beginning and till the end of the 20th century. And what I found was the most reputed, most talented, most famous and glamorous of all of them was the one and only….MICHAEL JACKSON THE KING OF POP. Yes this is the name of the person, who was out of this world, though of Brazilian origin. You can quite easily understand it. But the truth is always hurting; he is no more with us. But we don’t get disheartened. Do we? Therefore to remember him always I and my friend (sumobhai) did a little hard work to find THE BEST 10 SONGS OF MICHAEL JACKSON EVER. Did you like the idea? And one thing I wish to tell is that didn&rsqu...

John Adams: "Shaker Loops," Minimalism Through the Late 20th Century

Shaker Loops (1982) John Adams received his musical training at Harvard where he was active as a clarinetist, conductor and composer. After graduation, he moved to California, and eventually settled permanently in San Francisco. There, he joined the faculty of the San Francisco Conservatory - a post he held for ten years. Adams was later appointed composer- in-residence to the San Francisco Symphony; this appointment lasted from 1978 to 1985. Along with Philip Glass, Steve Reich, and Terry Riley among the most famous, Adams is associated with the movement in music known as minimalism. This term was originally used to describe certain works in the fields of painting and sculpture in the late 1960's. Its aesthetic ideals are, as the term itself implies, a reduction to the barest of essentials of whatever material or medium the artist is working with. In music, this has come to mean the use of repetition of melodic ideas and rhythmic motifs, within a mostly tonal harmonic framework and ...

Camille Saint-Saens at Age 18: Symphony No. 1 in E-flat Major, Op. 2

No other composer played so great a part in establishing the modern school of French music as Camille Saint-Saëns. He worked in every musical genre, always reaching for and cherishing formal and stylistic perfection. His music always conveyed elegance of melodic line and architectural beauty, achieved by his mastery of musical means and skillful technical manipulation. Saint-Saëns may be characterized as an eloquent and prolific composer, an inspiring teacher, a brilliant conductor, and a most agile pianist and organist. He distinguished himself as a critic and editor, and was also a recognized poet and dramatist. Saint-Saëns was endowed not only with a great intellect and talent, but also with a tremendous energy and tireless capacity for work. As part of his vast output of compositions, Saint-Saëns composed a total of five symphonies, but allowed only three of them to be published. His first two works in this form were attempts made in 1848 and 1850, along with a...

Reeps One - New School Beatbox Father

Reeps One ( Harry Yeff ) is a New School Beatboxer, which is known for his Deep baselines. He is also recognized as a New School Beatboxing ‘ father ‘. Personaly he’s my mentor, I love to listen to him and my style is similar. He gained his nickname by his friend, reeps asked friends to find him a good nickname, one day his colleague said he should be Reeps One, he liked it. Reeps one is a double winner of Vauxhall Beatbox Championship,  at the final he fought with hobbit for the first place. It was a tough battle . Nowadays Reeps have a lot of events, he was beatboxing in a small room ( acoustic ) and also on a Big Scene( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aglNZClkzu0 ) , lots of people was watching him beatboxing. He was also at ' youtube stars london event ', Dubstep Music Awards 2011, Subrockerz, Hype Biringham and he will be on farmfestival 2012 you can buy tickets from here : http://www.skiddle.com/artists/reeps-one-123488966/events.html . Reeps one is al...

7 Entertaining Rock Facts: Featuring Kiss, Twisted Sister, Ozzy Osbourne and Billy Idol

Twisted Sister Image from dacostilla.files.wordpress.com 1. Twisted Sister front man Dee Snider (above, in the middle) had to testify at a hearing, organized by Parents Music Resource Center because of the song “We are not gonna take it”. Their argument was that the song promoted violence against teachers and parents. Dee went to the hearing in torn jeans and well, wearing little eyeliner. His “defense” was in his back jean pocket, a bunch of papers that all crumpled. However the PMRC members weren’t ready for what came next. Dee was perfectly articulate, his command for English was perfect and his argument for the song and against the ridiculousness of the claim. The committee had no choice but to drop everything. While the band’s drag queen costumes (their words, not mine) may not be for everybody, they provide great value to rock n’roll. The song is perfect for letting all the negativity, anger and angst out and having fun with it. This so...

Song Review: Five Finger Death Punch's Remake of Bad Company

Growing up in the early 80's, Bad Company was a great band, in my opinion, and I loved many of their songs, especially their eponymous single. When I first heard Five Finger Death Punch's version of the song "Bad Company," performed, of course, by Bad Company originally, I was not a fan. When I would drive in my car and hear it, I would immediately turn it off. However, I often ride in my boyfriend's car, and he liked the song, so he'd leave it on... Apparently the FFDP version grew on me after hearing it a few times, and I just couldn't get enough! I couldn't wait to hear it in the privacy of my own car so I could growl along with the song! Five Finger Death Punch Although I mentioned I like to "growl" along with the FFDP version of Bad Company, I am half-joking. Let me explain... Five Finger Death Punch, as you may assume from the name of the band, is a heavier band. However, the singer, although he does seem to growl at times and scream, has a very melodic and ...

Tchaikovsky's Piano Concertos (Part 1 of a Series)

Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 23 The composer's autograph "In December 1874 I had written a Piano Concerto! Not being a pianist, I considered it necessary to consult a virtuoso as to any points in my Concerto that might be technically impracticable, ungrateful or ineffective. I had need of a severe critic, but at the same time one friendlily disposed towards me." Thus wrote Tchaikovsky to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, describing the circumstances in which he presented his newly written First Piano Concerto - one of the best-loved in the repertoire today - to his much admired and trusted senior colleague at the Moscow Conservatory, Nikolay Rubinstein. Tchaikovsky suffered one of the biggest disappointments of his career when, on Christmas Eve, Rubinstein - who had been so supportive of the composer in the past - rejected the concerto with a rush of scathing criticism, summarily declaring the work ill-composed and unperformable. "I played the first movem...

9 Def Leppard Facts featuring Joe Elliot, Phil Collen, Vivian Campbell, Rick Allen, Rick Savage and Steve Clark

1. Def Leppard members currently consist of lead singer Joe Elliot, lead guitarist Phil Collen, guitarist Vivian Campbell, drummer Rick Allen and bassist Rick Savage. When the band was founded in Sheffield in 1977, Joe Elliott, Rick Allen and Rick Savage were among the founders. 2. Def Leppard came to Turkey in 2008. They performed on the same night with Whitesnake. Actually, Whitesnake performed before them. In a weird sense, Whitesnake was their opening “act”. This wasn’t the only festival they were a part of in the same year. In 2006, in Sölversborg, Sweeden, both English Bands were featured. That time they were the main act on different nights. Def Leppard performed right after the American band WASP. Whitesnake played the night before, taking the scene after Alice Cooper. At that time, I lived in Norway so I didn’t mind the “drive” to the concert. Sadly I couldn’t afford the tickets for two nights so I chose to see Def Leppard. 3. D...

Eugene Ysaye: The Violin Teacher's Teacher

Unlike many of music history's greatest figures, Eugène Ysaÿe was no child prodigy, which probably proved to be of advantage later. At one point he was dismissed from the Liège Conservatoire, due to basically poor performance. Overcoming this obstacle, he was re-admitted to the conservatory and went on to study with Wieniawski, and in 1876 with Vieuxtemps in Paris. In the words of Carl Flesch, Ysaÿe was "the most outstanding and individual violinist I have ever heard in my life." This opinion was shared by a generation of violinists who idolized Ysaÿe - Kreisler, Thibaud, Szigeti, Enesco and countless others who revered him as the pioneer of twentieth-century violin playing. Eugene Ysaÿe has been seen by many as a bridge between the highly individualistic, interpretation-minded nineteenth century, and the increasingly depersonalized and text-conscious twentieth century. By 1880 he became Concert Master of Bilse's Orchestra in Berlin. He held...

The Timeless Bernstein: Sonata for Clarinet and Piano (1941-42)

Sonata for Clarinet and Piano (1941-42) (“For David Oppenheim”) There have been very few figures in the arts who have been as well-rounded as Leonard Bernstein. He was truly a Renaissance man who wore many hats: in addition to his obvious position as a composer, conductor, pianist, and recording artist in all three categories, he was also the author of numerous books and essays. He appeared in trailblazing television programs of his own writing, and was an inspiring teacher. Additionally, he delivered numerous lectures at universities and conservatories. Providing yet another aspect to his multifaceted persona, Bernstein was also involved with numerous civil liberties and humanitarian concerns throughout his life. The list of awards Bernstein received in his lifetime is astonishing; it includes: 21 Honorary Degrees; 13 foreign government decorations from eight countries; 13 Grammy Awards out of over 30 nominations; 16 platinum/gold and international record awards; 25 tele...

Composer James Horner : The Man and His Great Music on Movies

Films started with silent movies without dialogue and background music.  Films evolved with the help of technology and the integration of music on movies.  Music puts color and  heart to a film bringing out the roller coaster ride of the emotional aspect of the movie. The scenes are brought to life through the background music which is called the film score.  While the soundtrack is the commercial release  which includes the collection of sounds and songs used in the movie.  And that what makes James Roy Horner a master of movie film scoring and soundtracks having numerous blockbuster movies like “Titanic”and “Avatar”. James is a composer, orchestrator, conductor of orchestral and film music.   Born on August 14, 1953 at Los Angeles California USA to parents Joan and Harry Horner. He was first influenced by his father who worked in the film industry as production designer, set designer and a film director. At hi...

Paganini and the Solo Violin: Caprice No. 24

Nicolò Paganini was perhaps history's most celebrated violin virtuoso and one of the most fascinating figures in nineteenth century music. He excited the curiosity of all who saw him, and there was always an aura of mystery associated with him; the words "fantastic," "prodigious," and "supernatural" were constantly used by his contemporaries when they spoke or wrote about him. Some people swore that the man had made a pact with the devil, and some even claimed to have seen "the devil at his elbow, directing his arm and guiding his bow." More importantly, however, he elicited the mingled amazement and admiration of all who heard him play, including such Romantic figures as Schumann, Chopin, Théophile Gautier, and even Goethe, who was thirty-three years his senior. Rossini, who was not given to unrestrained praise, looked upon Paganini with devotion, and at the same time, something akin to fear. Meyerbeer followed the virtuoso through...

Facts About Country Music Artist Chris Young

Chris Young is a country music artist who is quickly making a name for himself. Chris has been around awhile, but with two songs hitting #1 in 2010 people are starting to take notice of who this guy actually is and what he can do in the music business. Get to know Chris with these facts about this country music star. Chris won the show "Nashville Star" in 2006. He sang his original song "Drinkin' Me Lonely" on the show. He went on tour with the show before starting tours of his own and as an opening act for other big name country music stars. Chris is a huge fan of Keith Whitley. He is a recording artist for RCA records. He has two albums out, but also recorded an older one which is hard to find. He also has a Christmas CD, but this one is hard to get your hands on as well. Chris recorded a duet with Willie Nelson on his latest album. The song is called "Rose in Paradise." He is on tour right now opening up for Rascal F...

Bryan Adams' Dirtiest Songs: 4 Fast and Non-Romantic Songs by Bryan Adams

Who here hasn’t heard of Bryan Adams? The Canadian rocker has made a name for himself for his amazing love songs, the most popular one being "(Everythig I do) I do it for you". It is featured in the soundtrack of the 1991 movie Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves starring Kevin Costner. It spent months at number one on the charts worldwide. And with a voice like his, singing slower love songs with beautiful lyrics make such sense. You might also remember his duet with Barbara Stresiand for the soundtrack of Mirror Has Two Faces, starring Streisand and Jeff Bridges. And who can forget the beautiful acoustic number "Have you ever really loved a woman?" featured in the movie Don Juan DeMarco starring Johnny Depp?  There are many more greatly successful romantic hits by the man. But this is the great thing about good rockers. They are just as good at the mischievously fun stuff as they are good at the romantic songs. While these songs may not have been as popula...

Gershwin's Finest Work: the Piano Concerto in F Major (1925)

Concerto in F major for Piano and Orchestra (1925)   Gershwin at the piano Revenue from recordings, performances and score rentals of Rhapsody in Blue following its premiere accelerated Gershwin’s career. In early 1925 he moved his family to an elegant townhouse on New York’s upper west side, where he began to put more emphasis on composing concert music. His Concerto in F major of 1925 (with the initial title of “New York Concerto”) was a logical sequel to Rhapsody in Blue. Not only was it longer and more elaborate, but it was cast in a form that made clear its intention to be taken seriously – and which in actuality did not stray far from the Classic Romantic model to which Gershwin aspired. The Concerto in F was a more ambitious project than the Rhapsody and took the composer several months to complete. The work was given a trial performance before its formal premiere in 1925 by Walter Damrosch and the New York Symphony Orchestra at the Aeoli...

Unsung Guitar Greats: Erik Braunn (with Classic Video)

Perhaps the most recognized song of the American psychedelic/acid rock era, “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” (from the like-titled In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida), remains one of the most imitated and referenced songs in American pop culture history (even the Simpsons did an homage). The second studio album by the American rock band Iron Butterfly, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida was released in 1968, peaking Billboard charts at #4, and was given the unique distinction of being the first album in history to be awarded “platinum” status after the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) began to acknowledge that level of achievement in 1976.  Record sales of this album were like nothing in recording industry history, causing executives to reimagine the potential for music industry profits--as well as the effect music could have on American society.  (This album set an industry precedent.) The album sleeve for In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida shows the band on stage at Fillmore E...

Singers Whose Surname Is Gray That Have Had Hits In The UK Charts

As a surname, Gray may not be as popular as other coloured surnames, but that hasn't stopped a number of singers called Gray having had chart hits in the UK. As with most shared musicians surnames, none of them are related, and their chart careers can either be hit or miss - a number of chart hits versus just the one or two. Anyroads, without much further ado, here is a look at all the singers whose surname is Gray that have had hits in the UK charts. Singer David Gray may well have felt that he was heading for a music career where commercial success was going to pass him by entirely. His first two albums were released in 1993 and 1993 respectively, but neither helped him to gain notoriety outwith folk circles. His third album Sell, Sell, Sell was released in 1996 and failed to chart. In 1998 he released White Ladder and it bombed. Just before the year 2000 began in earnest, the album White Ladder was re-released and the song Please Forgive Me managed to sneak in to the UK charts at...

6 Fast Bon Jovi Songs That Feature The Word Love

Just because a song features the word love, it doesn’t necessarily be a slow number. It can still be about romantic love while rocking the hell out of you or it can be about “loving” something else all together. Or it might not be romantic at all. Here are some examples from Bon Jovi: You Give Love a Bad Name The title pretty much says it all. And the lyrics back it up: “An angel's smile is what you sell You promise me heaven then put me through hell Chains of love got a hold on me When passion's a prison you can't break free Whoa! You're a loaded gun (yeah) Whoa! There's no where to run No one can save me The damage is done Shot through the heart And you're to blame You give love a bad name” It is rumored to be written for actress Diane Lane who dated front man Jon Bon Jovi for a little while in the 80s. We can’t know for sure but we sure can enjoy this 8os rock classic and dedicate to anyone who pisses us off or breaks our heart...

Symphonic Waltzes from Russia

A dance in triple time, the waltz originated around the middle of the eighteenth century in the region comprised by Southern Germany, Austria and Bohemia. The initial simplicity and unsophisticated form of the waltz helped it to gain immense popularity and wide social acceptance by the end of the eighteenth century. By the first quarter of the nineteenth century it had already become the most popular of the diverse ballroom dances in existence. The waltz has proven to be the most enduring of dance forms; furthermore, its influence on music history has probably been greater than that of any other (including the minuet, which was so pervasive in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries). As its popularity increased, a great number of composers tried their hand at the form - Schubert, Chopin, Weber and Brahms to name only a few. Gradually, the waltz gained more and more in sophistication and even grandeur, with the epitome of the waltz being reached in the works of Johann Straus...

Facts About Carlos Toshiki (????????­)

Carlos Toshiki, the second lead singer for the Japanese Adult-Oriented Rock (AOR) band Omega Tribe was born in the city of Maringa, in the Parana state in Brazil. After Kiyotaka Sugiyama left the band in the mid-80’s, Toshiki was the main vocalist for the band until it was disbanded in the early 1990's, when Toshiki decided to start a solo career. After his solo career went on as Carlos Toshiki, and as his alternate J-pop ballad persona; Toshiki Takahashi, whose songs focused more on commercialized Japanese pop ballads, rather than his summer-themed AOR songs from way back. He did have some musical stints after his time of fame during the 00’s, however he stopped his musical career first to manage his restaurant in Brazil at this point in time. His best hits during his career were mostly from the time he was with the Omega Tribe (not the anarcho-punk band). Popular hits such as: You are 1000% (Kimi wa 1000% / ??1000%) – This song has reached the Oricon (Japanese billb...

Rock Band Kiss and 8 Kiss Songs That Feature The Word Rock

Image via http://www.overdose.co.kr Kiss was founded in 1973 in The United States. There is a big chance you are familiar with their black and white stage make-up, accompanied by equally vibrant outfits. Their debut album carried the band’s name and was released in 1974. Since then, their album sales in total have gone over 100,000,000 and they won many awards. They filled stadiums and they maintain their popularity due to their fun rock songs, great marketing strategies, on-stage theatrics and band member Gene Simmons’ extra long tongue, which is well over 7 inches. image via: http://www.quizlaw.com/blog/ Gene Simmons Tongue The band has released many albums, the last one being Sonic Boom which was released in 2009. In between these albums, some themes in lyrics showed more than the others. Just like many rock bands, Kiss loved using the word rock in their lyrics. Here are 8 Kiss songs with the word rock in them: 1) Song: Let Me Go, Rock 'n' Roll The first ...

Gershwin Goes to Havana: The Cuban Overture (1932)

Cuban Overture (1932) After the success of An American in Paris, Gershwin wrote two more concert works: the Second Rhapsody and Cuban Overture. In both of these works the composer seems to have supressed his gift for melodic invention, putting the emphasis on thematic and rhythmic development and interrelation, as well as concentrating his efforts on the contrapuntal and harmonic framework and the mastering of orchestration. Both works even have clear instances of polytonality, and as with An American in Paris, the careful listener can discern the influence of the French Impressionists in the Cuban Overture, particularly that of Debussy's Iberia. The Cuban Overture (which was originally called Rumba) was composed in 1932, after a pleasure trip to Havana that Gershwin took earlier that year in February, when the composer was fascinated by the music he heard on the streets of the Cuban capital. As such, the work is rich in the flavor, color and animation of the island of Cuba. Chi...

Mikhail Glinka: Overture to Russlan and Ludmila

Mikhail Glinka The son of wealthy landowner, Mikhail Glinka attended school in St. Petersburg and later studied composition in Italy and Germany. Given that the Russian composers prior to him were either amateurs or strongly influenced by foreign schools, Glinka is regarded as the founder and father of Russian music. In his reliance upon Russian folksongs as a source of inspiration, he was the first to give Russian music a language of its own. Furthermore in his nationalistic approach to composition, he came to exert a profound and freely acknowledged influence upon Balakirev (1837-1910) and Tchaikovsky (1840-1893). The fairy-tale poem Russlan and Ludmila established the twenty-one-year-old Pushkin's success virtually overnight. Pushkin was attracted by Glinka's project for an opera based on the poem, but he had hardly begun to arrange the libretto when he died as the result of a wound incurred in a duel. Glinka then employed no less than five librettists to complete the adap...

Brief Notes on the Galamian Technique

Ivan Galamian, one the greatest violin teachers of his time, (January 23, 1903-April 14, 1981) was born in Tabriz, Iran to Armenian parents. Shortly after his birth, they moved the family to Moscow, Russia. During the Bolshevik Revolution, Galamian left Russia and lived in Paris, studying under respected French violinist Lucien Capet. Initially, planning to become a concert violinist, a love of teaching, among other considerations, led him to become a violin teacher. Galamian became a faculty member at the Russian Conservatory in Paris. By the late 1930's Galamian came to the U.S. permanently, teaching first at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and then at the Julliard School of Music, where he became head of the violin department.  He also created the Meadowmount School of Music, a summer program located in Westport, New York.  Galamian also wrote two books, The Principles of Violin Playing and Teaching (1962) and Contemporary Violin Technique (1962). Violinists ...

The Folksongs of Benjamin Britten, 1943-60

The youngest son of musical parents, Britten’s prolific composing attracted the attention of Frank Bridge at the Norwich Festival of 1924 and Britten became his pupil for six years. Bridge taught the young Britten to how to attain a superb compositional technique and the ability to look beyond the limitations of the nationalist manner that was the method in most institutional teaching. Over thirty years later, Britten said with striking generosity, that he did not feel he had yet come up to the technical standards set for him as a boy by this teacher to whom he felt he owed so much. By the time Britten returned to England in 1942, instrumental writing was predominant in his output: eighteen of his twenty-five sizable scores consist of chamber and orchestral works. Because of his pacifist convictions he received conditional exemption from war service, but this meant that he was required to spend a considerable amount of time performing at C.E.M.A. concerts throughout the country....

Johann Christian Bach: The Use of Double Orchestra - Sinfonia, Op. 18, No. 3

Sinfonia for Double Orchestra in D major, Op. 18, No. 3 JOHANN CHRISTIAN BACH Born September 5, 1735 in Leipzig Died January 1, 1782 in London Johann Christian Bach, the youngest son of Johann Sebastian and his second wife, Anna Magdalena, was one of the most cosmopolitan members of the Bach family.  After the death of his father in 1750, Johann Christian went to live with a half-brother, Carl Philipp Emanuel, who, as cembalist at the court of Frederic II in Berlin, continued his instructions in clavier playing.  Burney, the historian, attributed Johann Christian’s “expressive and masterly performance on the pianoforte” to Carl Philipp Emanuel’s teaching.  It was while Johann Christian lived in Berlin that he began to compose concertos for the piano. Around 1754 he went to Italy where he was a musician to the friendly and protective Count Agostino Litta at Milan.  He had some lessons with the famous Padre Martini of Bologna, and, he woul...

Unraveling the Performance Practices of JS Bach: Preludium, Fuge und Allegro in E-flat major, BWV 998

It is so much believed that Johann Sebastian Bach was the pinnacle of the High Baroque, that it is generally accepted that this era in music history ended with his death in 1750. His output of compositions was huge, numbering well over 1000 pieces, and his style and techniques served as models for every future generation of composers. He learned his trade in much the same way as other composers, by voraciously reading, studying, copying and arranging the works of his predecessors and contemporaries. Bach often arranged the work of others to suit his needs, and therefore it is natural that his composition should be arranged for a different group of instruments than originally written. His choral compositions are easily chronicled as they were written for specific occasions. The keyboard works, on the other hand, are not as easily catalogued. His early works, in particular, often survive only in copies made by his students, and therefore few autograph scores are extant. During his...

Petrouchka (1947): Re-inventing the Nationalistic Period of Stravinsky

Pétrouchka (1947 version) Throughout the history of music, few composers have had an effect on the music of their time as dramatically as Igor Stravinsky. One of the most arresting composers of modern times, he maintained this position for over half a century from the moment The Firebird attracted world attention at its premiere in 1910, all the way to the end of his career. Like Picasso - another twentieth century genius with whom the composer has often been compared and with whom he had opportunity to collaborate in several occasions - Stravinsky made many dramatic changes in his compositional style; with each new work and each stylistic change he managed to focus the world's attention on his art. Stravinsky's nationalistic phase is demarcated by the three early balletic masterpieces The Firebird (1910), Pétrouchka (1911) and The Rite of Spring (1913) - each of which exhibits the influence of his teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov, and to a degree, that of Tchaikovsky an...

The Transcendental Etudes of Franz Liszt: the Complete Works for Piano

Etudes d'exécution transcendante As a composer, teacher and pianist, Franz Liszt developed new methods in his compositions - both imaginative and technical - which left their mark upon his forward-looking ideas and procedures. He also evolved the method of "transformation of themes" as part of his revolution in form, made radical experiments in harmony and invented the orchestral symphonic poem. Liszt was himself one of the greatest virtuosi on the pianoforte; he fully understood the instrument's genius and perceived the full its capabilities which he never failed to exhaust in his compositions. Works for the piano make up the greater part of Liszt's output, and certainly the Etudes are among the most significant. In 1847, Liszt met the Princess Carolyne Sayn-Witgenstein, with whom he was to maintain a relationship for most of the rest of his life. It was she who convinced him to abandon his career as a traveling virtuoso to concentrate on composition. It was ...

How to Choose Songs for a Great Concert Set List

Playing a great live rock or acoustic gig requires making a great set list. After playing close to one hundred shows I found have found tested results about pacing guitar and placing songs carefully in a set list to keep your audience engaged. Here are tips for how to prepare an awesome set list for acoustic and rock gigs and concerts. Start out at 100% energy and what would be the song you have at 80% of your fastest tune to start live concert. You want to be able to build up to peak energy in the middle of the show. You also want to come out at least 90 beats per second to get the crowd lively. Choose an opening song for your set list that is emblematic of your band or sound. For me, “Return” is a thematic entry to my shows that introduce the style I will be playing for the night. Take the speed notch up 5% to song number two of the set list. Keep the energy high and introduce a song with an additional element like a time stop or a solo to break up any feelings...

7 Interesting Facts About Rock Band Bon Jovi and The Band's Leading Singer Jon Bon Jovi

It is not uncommon for musicians to try out acting. Jon first got a role that lasted for about 2 seconds in the movie Young Guns 2, starring Kiefer Sutherland and Jon’s real life pal Emilio Estevez. Jon made the film’s music (you might remember the golden-globe winning hit Blaze of Glory), and Emilio thought it would be fun if Jon appeared in the film as well. It was fun and Jon decided to take acting lessons after that. His first major role was in Moonlight & Valentino where he starred opposite Gwyneth Paltrow, Kathleen Turner, Elizabeth Perkins and Whoopi Goldberg. When asked if he ever wrote a song for his wife, Jon replies that he wrote bed of roses for her. This led many fans believe that Jon might have cheated on his wife as the character in the song talks about lying next to one woman while being in love with another. But Jon said in one interview that if there was one thing he loved more than his wife, it was his money and he wasn’t about to give her to h...

Gershwin Goes to Europe: An American in Paris (1928)

Jacob Gershovitz (George Gershwin) began his career as a "song plugger" for a music publisher. He was soon collaborating with Jerome Kern and Irving Berlin as well as composing successful musicals of his own, the first of which was La La Lucille, which opened on Broadway in May 1919. Often collaborating with his brother Ira, George Gershwin became one of America's most gifted composers of popular songs, musicals, piano and orchestral works. He bridged the chasm between popular and "serious" music with his many songs and piano compositions, fused African-American folk music and opera in Porgy and Bess, and reconciled the improvisational style of jazz and classical orchestral traditions in such works as An American in Paris and Rhapsody in Blue. After the composition of the Piano Concerto in F in 1925, Walter Damrosch (who conducted that works' premiere as well as that of several other Gershwin scores) hailed Gershwin for having made it possible for jazz to ...

10 Songs from James Bond Films

1. Theme from “ From Russia with Love” (1963)  -   The song which was also titled the same as the second James Bond film after Dr. No, “From Russia with Love” became a classic song associated with this movie and brought popularity to then rising English singer Matt Monro. It was originally was originally composed by Lionel Bart of Oliver! 2. Theme from “Goldfinger” (1964)   -   Another James Bond theme song titled the same as the film, Goldfinger was sang by Welsh singer Shirley Bassey which unlike Matt Monro had already established herself well in her singing career. Goldfinger reached no. 1 at US charts and actually gained for Shirley Bassey another opportunity of singing James Bond film soundtracks in “Diamonds Are Forever” and “Moonraker”. 3. Theme from “Diamonds Are Forever” (1971)   -   Shirley Bassey had this second opportunity of singing this fi...

Traditional Irish Dance Music by Way of Americans: The Road to Lisdoonvarna

The origin of the word “jig” is most likely from the Old French giguer, containing the idea of a vigorous up and down movement of which the dance is expressive. Irish jig tunes, sometimes known as “ports,” are played in double time with each section repeated. Regular jigs consist of two eight-bar sections; irregular tunes have sections of unequal length and are employed in set-dances, each dance having its own name and movement figures. Single and double jigs are in 6/8 time, the single jig containing two quarter note-eighth note groups in each bar, the double jig containing two groups of triplets. The single jig is also normally in triple rhythm, but the typical bar has two quarter note-eighth note figures. Single jigs in 6/8 are called slides. The slip jig or hop jig is in 9/8 rhythm and the typical bar has nine eighth notes in three groups. Some jigs were once ancient marches. The jig is the oldest form of dance music now played, is usuall...

1880: Tchaikovsky's Capriccio Italien

Capriccio italien, Op. 45 Late in 1879, Tchaikovsky embarked on a long tour of Italy, one of the happiest and most carefree episodes in his life, but by no means was he musically idle.  During this time the composer was working on his Second Piano Concerto and was revising his Second Symphony. As part of the tour, he spent three months in Rome; there he was constantly delighted by the street songs, which sent him in search of volumes on Italian folk music. Soon he wrote to his faithful correspondent and patroness Madame Nadezhda von Meck that he was sketching an Italian fantasy for orchestra. Of the work, he wrote: "Thanks to the charming themes, some of which I have taken from collections and some of which I have heard in the streets, this work will be effective." Today, the Capriccio italien, Op. 45 is one of Tchaikovsky's most effective and satisfying small-scaled works for orchestra. The reason lies in the skill with which the composer put together his borrowed melo...

Borodin's Unfinished Work: Polovtsian Dances, from Prince Igor

Alexander Borodin was the founder and most active member of the famous "Neo-Russian Five," a group of composers banded together for the advancement of Russian music, particularly the proper utilization of native folk sources. The other four were Cesar Cui, Balakirev, Mussorgsky and Rimsky-Korsakov. Only one of these, Balakirev, was a professional musician to begin with, but all of them eventually devoted themselves entirely to the art. Borodin himself was a physician, Mussorgsky and Rimsky-Korsakov were officers in the military, and Cui was a lawyer. Franz Liszt regarded the medical doctor as one of the most gifted orchestral composers of the nineteenth century. His works display a sanity and clarity which could be expected from a scientist, utilizing beguiling melodies, powerful orchestration and the strong national feeling of a musician who was thoroughly Russian. Due to the demands of his full-time career, Borodin was unhurried when it came to composing. The First and Sec...

The Nine-Year-Old Mozart: the First of the Sonatas, K. 19D

Mozart was not always successful in his career during his lifetime, as his music was not always appreciated or understood. This was in many cases the result of the composer's moderne and advanced style of composition, which resulted in the inherent difficulties - too technically demanding for performers of the time, and often too conceptualized for his audiences. He was probably the finest pianist of his time, and exerted, both by his playing and through his compositions, a tremendous influence on the later technique of the keyboard. He insisted that it was a mistake to play too fast, although his digital dexterity was remarkable, and emphasized always a clean execution and a delicately controlled touch. To play Mozart well is perhaps the greatest test of a pianist, for his music mercilessly exposes any slipshod methods and genially refuses to succumb to the mannerisms of mere "personality." Mozart, in his early years, did not need to write out piano sonatas or variations &n...

Unsung Guitar Greats: Mick Ronson

While perhaps best known as one of David Bowie’s head “Spiders” from Mars, guitarist Mick Ronson is a renown song writer, multi-instrumentalist, solo performer, arranger, and producer whose talents were enlisted by Bob Dylan, Ian Hunter, Van Morrison, John Mellencamp, Morrissey, Elton John, Lou Reed, Roger McGuinn, Meatload, David Johansen, and Roger Daltrey--and that just scratches the surface. Michael "Mick" Ronson was born on May 26, 1946, in Beverley Road, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. As a child, Mick was trained in classical piano and violin, and then moved on to a number of other instruments throughout his life. Initially wanting to be a cellist, he picked up the guitar after hearing the music of Duane Eddy, whose use of the bass notes on his guitar reminded Mick of the cello. Joining his first band, the Mariners, in 1963 at the age of 17, Mick's stage debut was as the opening act for the Keith Herd Band at Brough Village Hall.  While wo...

Unsung Guitar Greats: Leslie West (with Classic Video)

Rock guitarist, singer, and songwriter Leslie West (Leslie Weinstein) was born on Monday, October 22, 1945 in New York City, and grew up in Hackensack, New Jersey. Though in later years he became known for a wide variety of music genres--from blues-rock to heavy metal--Leslie is best known among rock aficionados as one of the premier founders of heavy rock music. Beginning his musical pursuits in the early 1960s, Leslie’s musical career took it’s first major step forward with the first of his bands to gain public acclaim, The Vagrants, an R&B, “blue-eyed soul-rock” band said to have been influenced by groups like The Young Rascals--one of the few bands of the era to come out of Long Island rather than the Bohemian-centered Greenwich Village. The Vagrants had two minor hits, one in ‘66 with "I Can't Make a Friend," and a cover of Otis Redding's "Respect," the following year. Quickly nicknamed "The Fattest Fingers in R...

Glazunov's A Minor Violin Concerto: Early 20th-century Russia

Portrait of Glazunov, 1906, Valentin Aleksandrovich Serov The Russian composer Alexander Glazunov was a thirteen-year old when he became a pupil of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. In one and a half years he astonished his teacher by completing the entire course in composition, and at the age of sixteen, he had written his first symphony. Besides his technical facility, Glazunov had a remarkable musical memory. When working with Rimsky-Korsakov on completing and orchestrating the score of Borodin's opera Prince Igor it was found that the overture was missing.  Having once heard Borodin play the overture on the piano, Glazunov re-wrote the entire section from memory. In 1899 he was appointed professor of instrumentation at the St. Petersburg Conservatory.  Ten years later he became the Conservatory's director, a post that he held until 1930. The fact that Franz Liszt appreciated Glazunov as a composer gives us an insight into the reason for his quick rise to popularity.&...

Facts About George Strait

George Strait is more lovingly known as the “King of Country”. He holds the record for number one hits for a country music singer, but it gets better. Strait has topped every other music artist in the history of recorded music, regardless of genre. His music is classic country mixed with a unique flavor. He is most well-known for lost love songs like “The Cowboy Rides Away” and “Amarillo by Morning”. He’s been known to sing more up tempo songs such as “Wrapped” and “I Just Want to Dance with you” as well.   Recording History Strait recorded his first song, “Unwound”, in 1981. It quickly rose in the top ten list and there was no stopping the country music superstar. It was the release of his second album that brought the first number one single, “Fool Hearted Memory”, in 1982. Strait was destined for country music greatness. He was twenty-nine years old when he recorded that first single. S...

The Argentine Genius of Alberto Ginastera: Pampeana, Op. 21, No. 2

Alberto Ginastera tended to view his creative evolution as following the pattern of three distinct compositional periods. Despite the classification of three compositional periods, Ginastera demonstrates a remarkable continuity in terms of his approach to composition. The first, beginning with his ballet, Panambi, Op. 1, composed in 1936, lasted for nearly twelve years and was termed by the composer as his period of objective nationalism. His music of this period is characterized by the presence of Argentine traits and themes, predominantly tonal, and evidences the rhythmic and melodic influences of Argentine folk music, both song and dance. The second period, beginning with his String Quartet No. 1, composed in 1948, is referred to as the subjective nationalism stage. This period was to last for the next six years. His third period, termed neo-expressionism, began with the composition of the String Quartet No. 2, composed in 1958. The music of this period is characterized by his use o...

Introduction to the 1720s: JS Bach's Orchestral Suite No. 1 in C Major, BWV 1066

Orchestral Suite No. 1 in C major, BWV 1066 It is generally believed that Bach composed his four Orchestral Suites (referred to as Overtures in his day) during his service to Prince Leopold in Cöthen (1717-1723). However, it has also been theorized that, due to the elaborate nature of these works, they may be the product of Bach's tenure at Leipzig, where he conducted them at concerts of the Collegium Musicum after he assumed the directorship in 1729. Unfortunately, the original manuscripts have not survived, and there are no written records giving us any clear details of the advent of these works. In any event, modern-day musicians and audiences alike are indeed fortunate to have in the concert repertoire these exquisite compositions, which have been reconstructed from existing individual parts collected from various libraries and other sources. JS Bach, ca. 1720 Clearly marked by French influences, the Suites are composed of a number of dances, favorites of the time, and in...

The Ballades of Frederic Chopin

Four Ballades The very famous photo of Chopin Of all the composers of music for the piano, Chopin holds the enviable position of being the one whose music is most frequently performed. His contemporaries, perhaps from jealousy, were sometimes slighting; yet, despite their derogatory epithets, the fact remains that Chopin invented a keyboard style that fitted ideally into nineteenth-century Romanticism.  All his works demand of the player not only a flawless touch and technique but also an imaginative use of the pedals and a discreet application of tempo rubato, which Chopin himself described as a slight pushing or holding back within the phrase of the right-hand while the left-hand continues in strict time.  His music is tinged with melancholy, suggesting a never-ending search for the unattainable, yet invariably it is arrayed in an impeccable technical structure. The title Ballade implies a story, legend, or poetic narration, full of drama and surprise - sometimes ...

Composer John Cage and His Avant-garde 4'33" Musical Piece

John Cage, The Avant-garde Composer (September 5, 1912 – August 12, 1992) He was born as John Milton Cage, Jr. at Los Angeles, California.  He was considered as one of the most influential American composer and was widely known for his avant-garde music.  Avant-garde word origin means "advance guard" or "vanguard" from the army advancing in the battle. An avant-garde refers to people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics. His early years as the son of an inventor, John Milton Sr. and a Los Angeles Times journalist influenced him to be intuitive and experimental. He  started  piano lessons at the age four and later mentors are Richard Buhlig, Henry Cowell, Adolph Weiss, and Arnold Schoenberg.  Cowell and  Schoenberg were also  both known for their radical innovations in music. His art and music draws from ordinary things in life and make the best ou...

Rode Violin Studies

Pierre Rode was a French violinist and contemporary of Beethoven who lived during the late 18th and early 19th century. Born in Bordeaux, France in 1774, Rode demonstrated musical talent early. He went to Paris to study with Giovanni Battista Viotti, the most acclaimed violinist in Europe at the time and the founder of the French school of violin playing. Working as a traveling virtuoso violinist, Rode went throughout Europe performing, arriving in Russia in 1804 where he was court violinist to the tsar. However, following his four years in Russia, his playing is said to have become more mannenerd and cold, according to one musical observer. His popularity as a performer evidently declined yet he still was musically active, premiering the opus 96 violin sonata by Beethoven. He also worked at the newly created Paris Conservatory and good friends of the Mendelssohn family. Besides his violin sonatas, Rode is also known today as the writer of a book of 24 caprices used for advanc...

Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture in B Minor

Tchaikovsky began work on the Fantasy-Overture Romeo and Juliet in September 1869. By the end of November he had completed the scoring, and arrangements were made for the work to be premiered in Moscow on March 16, 1870, with Nicholas Rubinstein conducting. During the summer of 1870 Tchaikovsky revised the work, making considerable changes. The score is dedicated to Mily Balakirev (1837-1910), one of the leading figures of "The Mighty Five" (a group of 19th century Russian composers including, in addition to Balakirev, Alexander Borodin, César Cui, Modest Mussorgsky and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, all of whom were united in their aim to create a distinctive nationalist school of music.) It was Balakirev who suggested the idea to Tchaikovsky for the Fantasy-Overture as well as its general outline. It is of interest that at a later date Tchaikovsky contemplated writing an opera on the Romeo and Juliet theme; a duet was sketched but left unfinished. The final measures o...

Songs You May Have Thought the Beatles Wrote, But Didn't

I think I speak for many of my generation when I say that nothing does an old child-of-the-60s heart and soul more good than to see yet another generation of youth around the world embracing The Beatles and their music.  For those of us who lived through that era--from their momentous appearances on the Ed Sullivan show to the announcement of their break-up--we know well the monumental impact they had not only on the world of music, but culture, religion, politics, as well as many of the seeds of change that have come to fruition over the last forty years.  While I certainly don’t wish to in any way dampen that ongoing and resurgent enthusiasm for the band that by most definitions was the greatest and most influential musical force of the 20th century, I have read numerous articles in recent months on sites like Factoizd and Associated Content, mistakenly referencing “Beatle” songs that while performed by the Beatles, and ...

Bernstein's Symphonic Dances from West Side Story: the 20th-century Urban Romance

Bernstein wrote in his book The Joy of Music, "But some people have "explained" the glory of a thunderstorm - now and then, with varying degrees of success - and such people are called poets. Only artists can explain magic; only art can substitute for nature. By the same token, only art can substitute for art. And so the only way one can really say anything about music is to write music." A prolific composer, Bernstein wrote for almost all genres. Without doubt, Leonard Bernstein was one of the greatest American composers. He was well trained, studying composition at Harvard, piano at Curtis and conducting at Tanglewood. He had his conducting debut while still in college conducting his own incidental music to The Birds. After studying with Serge Koussevitzky, he became his conducting assistant and later took over the orchestral and conducting posts at Tanglewood after Koussevitzky's death. It was the sudden illness of Bruno Walter that propelled Bernstein into the ...

Zemlinsky's D Minor Piano Trio: Viennese Classicism

Austrian composer and conductor Alexander von Zemlinsky was highly regarded as a composer during his lifetime. He joined the Wiener Tonkünstlerverein in 1895 and attracted wide attention, including the admiration of Brahms, with several chamber works, some of which are now lost. Among his early large-scaled works, the opera Sarema (1895) and the Second Symphony (1897) were received with great public acclaim and critical success. As a composer, he received much encouragement from Mahler who conducted his second opera , Es war einmal, in 1900. In 1895 Zemlinsky met Schoenberg who became a life-long friend (and brother-in-law, when Schoenberg married Zemlinsky's sister in 1901). Zemlinsky taught Schoenberg counterpoint and guided his early compositions. It was with Schoenberg that in 1904 he founded the Vereinigung Schaffender Tonkünstler to foster the creation of new music in Vienna. Zemlinsky's stylistic development, as in this Trio, Op. 3, reflected the conservati...

Playing Classical Guitar: 40 Years in Two Segments (Second of a Series)

  The Model A #380, Alan Chapman   The Model B #484, Alan Chapman   New 2008, Alan Chapman Several odd years out of 38 of not playing the classical guitar can fill in a lot of musical gaps. I learned about music outside of my primary instrument while aiming for profiency on another, something I never devoted sufficient time to, and had the time to study works outside of those limitations. Guitar repertoire is so confining and some of it is so overplayed and misplayed and has earned a justifiably weak reputation. I don’t have any interest or purpose to play music I don’t like from the start, though that is and was often very necessary in order to attain some proficiency. Robert Secrist used to submit me to some grueling stuff that was miles beyond me in my early twenties, just to whet my whistle, and that had good and bad results at that point. It was technically frustrating to play stuff that was five or ten ...

The Smiths' Album Covers

The Smiths were formed in Manchester in 1982. Based on the song writing partnership of Morrissey (voice) and Johnny Marr (guitars), the group also included Andy Rourke (the bass guitar) and Mike Joyce (the drums). The band picked their name as a reaction against the elaborate names used by synthpop bands of the early 1980s. The Smiths dressed in ordinary clothes, contrasting with the exotic high-fashion image cultivated by New Romantic groups such as Spandau Ballet and Duran Duran. In 1986, when The Smiths performed on the British music program The Old Grey Whistle Test, Morrissey wore a fake hearing aid to support a hearing-impaired fan who was ashamed of using one, and frequently wore thick-rimmed National Health Service-style glasses. The group had a distinctive visual style, which was exhibited on their album and single covers.  Designed by Morrissey and Rough Trade art coordinator Jo Slee, these regularly featured images of film and pop stars, usually in duotone, Single cov...

1884: Grieg's Commemorative Suite, "From Holberg's Time," Op. 40

In the year 1884, Norwegians were celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ludvig Holberg, a satiric dramatist who was known in his time as "The Molière of the North." Grieg, the foremost Norwegian composer, who was also born in the same town (Bergen) as Holberg, was commissioned to write commemorative music for the occasion. The result was a cantata for a cappella male choir and this Suite. The "Holberg" Suite, as it is commonly known, was originally composed for piano in the summer of 1884, and was orchestrated by the composer a few months later.   Edvard Grieg in 1884 Grieg decided that his tribute to Holberg should resemble music which the dramatist himself would have heard, so he wrote the Suite as a French Baroque dance suite, a form which was very popular during the eighteenth century. Although he was employing an antiquated form, Grieg attempted to fuse the Rococo manner with Norwegian melody as well as his own individual style. &nbs...

2010 We Are the World 25th Anniversary to Benefit Haiti Video Lyrics Full List of Singers

The 25th anniversary recording of We are the World to benefit Haiti features over 80 artists (the full list of singers and the video is below). The 'We Are the World' video premiered during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony on Friday evening. Many stars came together to sing the famous, timeless song once again just as they did 25 years ago. In attendance were pop singers, rappers, country artists, rockers and actors. They even found a way to include the late King of Pop Michael Jackson in the video. A full list of everyone who participated is below. The song was recorded on February 1, 2010, in the same studio as the original wasdone 25 years ago (Henson Recording Studios which was formerly A&M Recording Studios) The original song “We are the World” was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, and was first introduced 25 years ago to aid Africa. This version of the song was a little different, a rap written by Will.I.Am was added towards the en...

1932 in Paris: Poulenc's Concerto in D Minor for Two Pianos and Orchestra

Concerto in D minor for Two Pianos and Orchestra Francis Poulenc was a member of the French group of composers referred to as "Les Six." When the group was first formed, they stood in an open rebellion against the overt romanticism of César Franck and the impressionism of Claude Debussy. This group which also included Milhaud and Honnegger, established simplicity of thought and expressions as their program; their music was distinguished by succinctness and a flair for popular idioms. There is in Poulenc's music an ingenuity and freshness that seem always to have an undercurrent of folklore at its base. Poulenc's catalog includes such diverse genres as ballets, opera, chamber music, sacred music, songs, choral works and piano pieces. The medium in which Poulenc distinguished himself the most was perhaps the concerto - a form which he renewed, broadened and diversified; his concertos indeed hold a very special place among his works. They include: the Concert champ&ecir...

Facts on Tim McGraw and Faith Hill

Tim McGraw’s birth name is Samuel Timothy McGraw. He was born on May 1, 1967 in Delhi, Louisiana. Tim McGraw’s mom was a waitress and his dad was a pitcher for the New York Mets and the Philadelphia Phillies. His parents never got married. When Tim McGraw’s mom got pregnant, her mom sent her away to have the baby and live with other family members. For several years Tim McGraw thought his last name was Smith until he was 11 years old. At 11 years old, he met his biological father, Frank Edwin McGraw Jr. Tim McGraw’s biological father passed away in 2004. Tim McGraw learned how to play the guitar when he was in college and began singing to earn some money. In 1989, he dropped out of college and moved to Nashville, Tennessee to start singing professionally. He enjoyed singing country music. Tim McGraw is a country artist and an actor. Tim McGraw has made a name for himself with his incredible voice. He later started acting as well and has been in sever...

How to Play "Heart and Soul" on the Piano

Heart and Soul is an easy song to learn for beginners on the piano and sounds cool. The music was composed by Hoagy Carmichael and the lyrics written by Frank Loesser. Published in 1938, it has appeared in a number of movies and TV series. Here's how to play it! Step 1: Place your left hand with your index finger on middle "C," your middle finger on the "A" note right below it, and your little finger on the "H" note right below the previous "A" note.  Step 2: With your right hand, have it where your little finger is on the "C" note right above middle "C," and your middle finger on the "E" note right above the previous "C" note. And finally you want your ring finger on the "G" note right above the previous "E" note. When I say put one finger on a note above a previous ...

3 Great Punk Rock and New Wave Couples from Blondie, the Cramps, and Talking Heads

Rock couples are intriguing. Big talent and even bigger personalities can be disastrous when they get together romantically. We usually hear about the stories that end badly (think Sid and Nancy). These three couples, however, either stayed together or remained lifelong friends. Whether or not they're still in love, these punk rock and New Wave couples are always fascinating. Debbie Harry and Chris Stein (Blondie): The couple that plays together doesn't necessarily stay together, but Debbie and Chris Stein of Blondie had a good run. The frontperson and guitarist, respectively, became a couple while in the seminal New Wave / pop band Blondie. Blondie were early players in the New York punk rock and New Wave scenes, which came together at Hilly Krystal's now-legendary but defunct club CBGB & OMFUG. Blondie had a string of hits, some of which were featured on major movie soundtracks. Later, Debbie took care of Chris while he suffered from an autoimmune disease. De...

Purchasing an Acoustic Guitar: A Guide for Beginners

Purchasing a guitar for a beginning student up to a working professional shouldn’t be a regrettable experience.  Approaching  the process with a little know-how and common sense, the task can be easy, fun and productive for anyone at any age. Deciding your needs Like many other purchases, such as sound equipment, cars, clothes or jewelry, choosing a guitar first requires that you establish your budget.  In many cases, you get what you pay for, and there isn’t usually a secret or special bargain to be had.  The “too good to be true” adage most often applies.  Since we are limiting our choices to non-electric guitars, here are the basics about acoustic guitars: Steel: Steel guitars are simply reinforced-construction instruments that are designed to be fitted with metallic strings.  These make a very distinctive sound and produce a great deal of volume. They’re best suited for advanced players because the strings are so sha...

We Shall Overcome: The Music of Pete Seeger

Pete Seeger is a legendary figure within American folk music. As a singer, musician and songwriter he played a central role in the Folk Revival of the 1950s and 60s and became a prominent singer of protest music in support of the Civil Rights movement. He is renowned for songs of hope and struggle, freedom and protest. Collecting songs from throughout the United States, he has committed the soul of America to record. Seeger was one of the folksingers who popularised the spiritual ‘We Shall Overcome’, a song that became the anthem of the American Civil Rights Movement. Seeger was born in French Hospital, Midtown Manhattan, the son of Charles Louis Seeger Jr., a composer and ethnomusicologist, and Constance de Clyver Edson, a classical violinist and teacher. Although Seeger's parents were professional musicians, they did not press him to play an instrument. Nevertheless, Seeger became adept at playing the ukulele. He first encountered the five-string banjo in 1936 at ...

Peteris Vasks and Latvian Mimimalism: Musica Dolorosa (1983)

Musica dolorosa (1983) Peteris Vasks is perhaps Latvia's foremost composer. The son of a parson, he went first to the Music High School in Riga and then the Litauische Music College in Vilnius. An accomplished bass player, he was a member of various symphony and chamber orchestras in the early 1970s but has since dedicated himself to the art of composition. As a young composer he had to contend with the Communist's party determination to control the form and content of all works of art, and yet, he was still able to arrive at a very personal style in which his Latvian identity began to emerge. After Latvia achieved its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Vasks and his music have played an intrinsic role in the creation and restoration of the country's national cultural identity. In speaking about his motives as a composer, Vasks has provided the statement: "When I think about contemporary life, it is impossible not to realize that we are balanced on the edge of time's ...

Frederick Delius - the End of Romanticism

Delius composed Prelude to Irmelin in the autumn of 1931 at Grez-sur-Loing. The first performance took place at Covent Garden, London in 1935 when Sir Thomas Beecham used it as an entr’acte in his revival of Delius’ opera, Koanga. Delius wrote his first opera, Irmelin, to a fairy tale text of his own devising during those early years in Paris when his music was just beginning to make its way. The opera was completed in 1892 and remains little known though a piano reduction of the score was prepared by no less than Florent Schmidtt. At the end of his life the composer turned once again to the poetic ideas that had inspired the opera. As an old man, crippled and blind, he dedicated this prelude, along with many other new or revised scores, to his youthful English amanuensis, Eric Fenby. The curious story of the collaboration of the two has been told by Mr. Fenby in an altogether remarkable little book, Delius As I Knew Him, from which the following passage about the prelu...